Photo Gallery 26

 

 

Coiled basket made by Susan Labiste.
The weavers are split sedge rhizomes and redbud. The foundation material are willow stems.
© D. Labiste 2004

 

 

Hawaiian composite fishhook made by Dino Labiste. The materials are bone, plant fiber cordage, and wood. Te Rangi Hiroa, who was the Director of the Bishop Museum from 1936 to 1951, noted that "A constant feature of the complete [Hawaiian composite] hooks was the use of small wooden wedges, driven in between the lashing and the hook to tighten up the lashing, which were used on both sides of the hook."
© D. Labiste 2004

 

 

Shooting a whistling arrow. As the arrow sailed into the sky, air passed through the 2 triangular vents in the gourd. This created a high pitched whistling sound as the arrow accelerated upwards and then downwards. Whistling arrows were utilized by ancient armies to signal their troops.
© D. Labiste 2004

 

 

Gourd bowls by Dino Labiste and Susan Labiste.
© D. Labiste 2005

 

 

Sawiy (Ohlone style tule baskets)
© D. Labiste 2005

 

 


Photo Gallery 21

Photo Gallery 22

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Photo Gallery 27

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Photo Gallery 30

PHOTO GALLERY I

PHOTO GALLERY II

PHOTO GALLERY IV

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We hope the information on the PrimitiveWays website is both instructional and enjoyable. Understand that no warranty or guarantee is included. We expect adults to act responsibly and children to be supervised by a responsible adult. If you use the information on this site to create your own projects or if you try techniques described on PrimitiveWays, behave in accordance with applicable laws, and think about the sustainability of natural resources. Using tools or techniques described on PrimitiveWays can be dangerous with exposure to heavy, sharp or pointed objects, fire, stone tools and hazards present in outdoor settings. Without proper care and caution, or if done incorrectly, there is a risk of property damage, personal injury or even death. So, be advised: Anyone using any information provided on the PrimitiveWays website assumes responsibility for using proper care and caution to protect property, the life, health and safety of himself or herself and all others. He or she expressly assumes all risk of harm or damage to all persons or property proximately caused by the use of this information.

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